A middle-aged African American man, wearing a brown jacket with a grey sweater and blue shirt, sits at a wood-paneled dais, gesturing as he speaks. Above and behind him, a sign reads "Greenbelt." Infront of him, a placard reads “Emmet V. Jordan, Mayor” To the left of him sits a younger African-American man wearing a dark shirt, infront of a placard reading “Colin A. Byrd, Councilmember”. To the right, an older white woman sits, wearing a matching red blazer and necklace, her nameplate reads “Judith F. Davis, Mayor Pro-Tem.”

Beltway Plaza redevelopment gets ‘conditional’ support of Greenbelt Council

Greenbelt City Council voted to conditionally support a conceptual redevelopment proposal for Beltway Plaza Mall. The action took place at its Feb. 11, 2019, meeting. While the mall’s owners, Bethesda-based Quantum Cos. hailed the move, there’s still a chance Greenbelt could end up opposing the conceptual site plan if city officials and the mall’s owners fail to agree on conditions set down during the meeting.

New Hyattsville Armory Apartments details revealed

The developers behind the Hyattsville Armory Apartments have fleshed out architectural designs for the proposed mixed-use development in the city’s downtown Baltimore Avenue corridor. Hyattsville City Council got a rundown on the new details at is Jan. 22, 2019, meeting. City officials have so far been receptive to the project, but some City Council members noted reiterated during the meeting concerns about affordability, parking and impacts on local schools. The Hyattsville Armory developers, Washington, D.C.,-based Urban Investment Partners, want to build a 285-unit mixed-use apartment building with 32,000 square feet of retail space on the western edge of the 5300 block of Baltimore Avenue between the Hyattsville Armory Crossover Church and Hamilton Street.

A large suburban strip mall is seen from above, at an angle. A sidewalk of street-facing retail, including a Shoe Show store, can be seen across a small two-lane circulator roadway.

Beltway Plaza update: Hearing pushed back as Greenbelt Council weighs proposal

While there are concerns about density and other issues, Greenbelt’s City Council seems cautiously supportive of a proposed redevelopment for Beltway Plaza. The six-phase plan would add between 175 and 250 townhomes or quadplex units, between 875 and 2250 multi-family units, and replace the 800,000 square-foot central mall with between 435,000 and 700,000 square feet of commercial retail space to the Greenbelt Road property. 

On Jan. 11, 2019, representatives from the city of Greenbelt and the mall’s owners, Bethesda-based Quantum Cos., briefly met with the Prince George’s County Subdivision Design Review Committee to discuss the proposed redevelopment. Nothing major came of the meeting, aside from the rescheduling of a Planning Board hearing for the proposed redevelopment to March 14, 2019, to give city officials there time to consider whether or not to support the proposal. Greenbelt City Council is tentatively scheduled to consider and vote on such a resolution at its Feb.

To block development, group wants College Park to buy Route 1 Metro property

Just north of Riverdale Park Station, a wooded tract of land sits for sale. On state property records, its listed at 4535 Albion Road. If you’ve ever driven between College Park and Hyattsville on Baltimore Avenue, you’ll recognize it by the grove of bamboo that fronts the eastern edge of the roadway. It is owned by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, which purchased the land for just under $432,000 in 1989 as it prepared to construct Metrorail’s Green Line out to Greenbelt. Underneath, tunnels carry trains between College Park and Prince George’s Plaza Metro stations. WMATA has recently listed the 12-acre property for sale.

Analysis: In UMD golf course debate, open space matters. So what is open space?

In the contentious debate over a proposal to build athletic field facilities on the University of Maryland Golf Course, defenders of the links have settled around two rhetorical framing devices. One is concerned with maintaining the golf course in its present operational state: 18 holes and a driving range with easy access to and from the clubhouse. But another, broader argument is concerned with preserving the golf course as a source of “open space.” This argument is frequently employed by nearby non-golfing residents who oppose redevelopment of the course. This argument is a tool, one that indicates to others why they should value the presence of a golf course in their neighborhood, despite perhaps not golfing themselves.